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Thread: In the Hop Garden

  1. #161
    Pub researcher (unpaid) rpadam's Avatar
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    Default Three storey oasts

    Most of the oasts featured so far have been two-storey structures, but this fine building has three storeys (probably with a separate stowage above a middle cooling floor).
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    Of course, the roundels only have two storeys below their conical roofs; the kilns at ground level and the drying floors above.
    Last edited by rpadam; 20-04-2020 at 22:10.

  2. #162
    Pub researcher (unpaid) rpadam's Avatar
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    Default A 2½-storey oast design

    This is another type of oast, of which there are several local examples, with a substantial stowage building that a modern-day developer might call a 2½-storey design (with an almost windowless upper level).
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    However, as you walk round the end, the whole appearance of the building changes dramatically, with the stowage obscured by a total of five round kilns (having particularly tall and sharply pointed roofs in this case, which somehow remind me of a fairy-tale French chateaux).
    (4)Click image for larger version. 

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    NB - Old Ordnance Survey maps only show three kilns, and you can just about make out that the two later additions furthest from the camera in picture (5) are built from a redder shade of brick. However, the building form suggests that the original building just had the pair of kilns shown in picture (4), an impression reinforced by the middle one in picture (5) seeming to have slightly darker roof tiles.

  3. #163
    Pub researcher (unpaid) rpadam's Avatar
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    Default An efficient mid-19th century design of oast

    This pleasingly symmetrical mid-19th century oast with three roundels on each long side of a central three-storey stowage was obviously planned for a high throughput from the start, rather than having extra kilns added over time.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    The design must have worked well, because there are at least three other examples elsewhere in the same parish...
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ID:	2130 left-hand oast, partly hidden behind trees (with another, smaller oast to its right)

  4. #164
    Old & Bitter oldboots's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rpadam View Post
    This pleasingly symmetrical mid-19th century oast with three roundels on each long side of a central three-storey stowage was obviously planned for a high throughput from the start, rather than having extra kilns added over time.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    The design must have worked well, because there are at least three other examples elsewhere in the same parish...
    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	2128 far distance, centre
    Click image for larger version. 

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Views:	9 
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ID:	2129 an easier one to photograph;
    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	2130 left-hand oast, partly hidden behind trees (with another, smaller oast to its right)
    Are you planning a book on the Kent Hop Trade or just enjoying the research?
    There are many diseases,
    that strike people's kneeses,
    Covid19! is one by name
    It comes from the East
    Packed in bladders of yeast
    So the Chinese must take half the blame.

    Apologies to Spike Milligan

  5. #165
    Pub researcher (unpaid) rpadam's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by oldboots View Post
    Are you planning a book on the Kent Hop Trade or just enjoying the research?
    Not sure - perhaps just finding a reason to go somewhere different each time for our daily 'Boris walk'?

  6. #166
    Pub researcher (unpaid) rpadam's Avatar
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    Default Solitary trees

    When out and about looking for oasthouses and other remaining parts and relics of the hop industry, my eye is starting to get caught by 'solitary trees' such as these.
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    Sadly, these ancient landmarks will eventually expire, but even in death they can retain a spooky grandeur...
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  7. #167
    Still about Mobyduck's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rpadam View Post
    When out and about looking for oasthouses and other remaining parts and relics of the hop industry, my eye is starting to get caught by 'solitary trees' such as these.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Sadly, these ancient landmarks will eventually expire, but even in death they can retain a spooky grandeur...
    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	2133 Click image for larger version. 

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    Yes they can be quite striking in an otherwise barren landscape.
    "Everybody's got to believe in something. I believe I'll have another beer."
    -W.C.Fields

  8. #168
    Pub researcher (unpaid) rpadam's Avatar
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    Default Non-residential oast conversions

    Nearly all the oasts pictured so far have been converted to residential use (with a couple of honourable exceptions), but there are other options too...
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    The one above is now rather incongruously located within a small rural industrial estate (albeit based in a former farmyard), but it has been carefully converted for business use.
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    This one was also converted for use as offices, although a financially-driven change of use to residential may now be approved through the planning system.

  9. #169
    Pub researcher (unpaid) rpadam's Avatar
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    Default An unconverted oast...

    Here's another rarity, an unconverted oast, a reminder of days gone by when almost every farm around here would have had at least a single kiln in operation at harvest time.
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    Mind you, this place operates as an agricultural museum these days (albeit now only open by appointment).
    Last edited by rpadam; 25-04-2020 at 20:54.

  10. #170
    This Space For Hire Wittenden's Avatar
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    Default

    Feature on p 7 of today's Sunday Crimes on Ali Capper and her band of hop trainers on their Worcestershire farm.
    "At that moment I would have given a kingdom, not for champagne or hock and soda, or hot coffee but for a glass of beer" Marquess Curzon of Kedlestone, Viceroy of India.

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