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About as unlike a modern IPA as you could imagine is the only way I could describe this Younger beer.

The 1938 iteration wasn’t exactly a hoppy beer. This is getting to levels that in England would be considered too low for a Mild Ale. What makes this an IPA then? Because that’s what the brewer called it. That’s my only criteria. With the one exception of Bass Pale Ale.

The gravity has fallen 20% since 1938. Though by 1944 you’d be a happy bunny if you stumbled across a beer this strong. The real FG would have been a few points lower, leaving it a bit over 4% ABV. Younger’s records annoyingly list the cleansing gravity rather than the racking gravity.

The recipe typical of Younger’s for the later war years. Just base malt and flaked barley. They didn’t have any choice about the latter. Everyone had to use it.

Just two types of Kent hops, both from the 1943 crop. But not very many of them. Leaving beer with just 15 (calculated) IBU. Very IPA-like bitterness, there.

1944 William Younger IPA Pale
pale malt 8.25 lb 64.71%
flaked barley 4.50 lb 35.29%
Fuggles 75 min 0.75 oz
Fuggles 30 min 0.50 oz
Goldings dry hops 0.25 oz
OG 1044
FG 1015
ABV 3.84
Apparent attenuation 65.91%
IBU 15
SRM 4
Mash at 153º F
Sparge at 160º F
Boil time 75 minutes
pitching temp 60º F
Yeast WLP028 Edinburgh Ale


The above recipe is taken from my latest book on IPA in WW II:





Currently it's only available in Kindle format. There will be a paperback Lulu version when I can be arsed.



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