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  1. #1
    This Space For Hire Wittenden's Avatar
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    Default Lost Beers

    Veteran beer blogger Tandleman was recently reminiscing about mainly Northern and therefore largely undrunk by me beers that he misses from his past. Here are some of mine from breweries closed or brewed by others.

    Fremlin's Bitter from Faversham aka Whitbread Trophy
    Paines Bitter,St Neots.
    Gray's Stock, Chelmsford
    Rayment's AK, Furneux Pelham
    All King and Barnes beers, Horsham, West Sussex
    Young's Ordinary and Winter Warmer, Wandsworth, Greater London.
    "At that moment I would have given a kingdom, not for champagne or hock and soda, or hot coffee but for a glass of beer" Marquess Curzon of Kedlestone, Viceroy of India.

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    This is not an exit Komakino's Avatar
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    One of the replies in the comments section mentioned not having seen Ringwood 4X Porter for a while; there's no mention of it on Ringwood's website and another website suggests it was last seen around 2018.
    "Breakneck speed we drown ten pints of bitter"

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    Still about Mobyduck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Komakino View Post
    One of the replies in the comments section mentioned not having seen Ringwood 4X Porter for a while; there's no mention of it on Ringwood's website and another website suggests it was last seen around 2018.
    That was me.
    Last edited by Mobyduck; 03-05-2020 at 20:40.
    "Everybody's got to believe in something. I believe I'll have another beer."
    -W.C.Fields

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    This Space For Hire Aqualung's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Komakino View Post
    One of the replies in the comments section mentioned not having seen Ringwood 4X Porter for a while; there's no mention of it on Ringwood's website and another website suggests it was last seen around 2018.
    I've had this beer in the last five (I think) years in a JDW. It seemed fine to me.

  5. #5
    Please give generously Quinno's Avatar
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    To recap mine;

    Gales Festival Mild (I had hopes that Fullers would do this occasionally as a one-off but that now seems very unlikely - haven't seen it for at least 5 years)
    Mad Hatter Tazatziki Sour (brewery bust)
    Grand Union Honey Porter (ditto)

  6. #6
    This Space For Hire AlanH's Avatar
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    My lost beers. Some vanished, some ruined, some rare and remembered with nostalgia.

    Most Manchester brewers had two milds (Boddingtons, Robinsons, Lees, Hydes)
    We travelled for miles to get Robinsons Dark Mild in the last two pubs serving it. We were never disappointed with it.
    We used to drink Lees Dark Mild in a pub near work. When they merged their Dark and Light milds into one, it was never as good.
    Hydes had Three! milds. A light and mid dark in Manchester and a Black Mild for the Welsh areas. When a Camra member first reopened the Marble Arch, he insisted on the Hydes Black Mild . Maybe nostalgia but we were convinced these black rare milds were superia.
    Thwaites Best Mild was superb, but you can't take the Black out of Blackburn (Burns too many holes!)
    Wilsons Bitter - The 1974 GBG said "Can be excellent" It was! The same beer in the 80's could have said "Avoid at all costs" Wilsons later admitted they ruined it to save costs.
    Boddingtons Bitter - The beer that changed my life (for the better). It was a very pale dull straw colour, almost hazy. When it turned golden and shiny it was gone. Boddingtons ruined it themselves to save money long before Whitbread got their hands on it. That was just the final death sentence.
    Pollards bitter. The first of the new breweries in the 70's. We used to drive to Camra's White Gates in Hyde in our lunch (hour!). I bought gallons of it in their Stockport brewing shop.
    Hartleys Bitter. Another regular lunchtime trip to the White Gates. When they changed to Hartleys Best Bitter it was not as lunch time slutching.
    I was also very partial to Marston's Merry Monk before they gave up brewing (proper) beer.
    Last edited by AlanH; 04-05-2020 at 21:12.

  7. #7
    Get some gravy on it. Maldenman's Avatar
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    Hi Alan, I can't say I took to Pollards at all, at the time it was certainly a novelty, being a new brewery in a time when such things were rarely heard of, but it tasted earthy and twiggy. I'm sure you could get it at the Coach and Horses opposite Piccadilly Stn Approach and there was also a pub in Salford I recall.
    Agree about Hartley's before Robbies got hold of it, many a hazy lost weekend in the South Lakes on their stuff.
    Ok, maybe just for one......................

  8. #8
    This Space For Hire Aqualung's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlanH View Post
    My lost beers. Some vanished, some ruined, some rare and remembered with nostalgia.

    Most Manchester brewers had two milds (Boddingtons, Robinsons, Lees, Hydes)
    We travelled for miles to get Robinsons Dark Mild in the last two pubs serving it. We were never disappointed with it.
    We used to drink Lees Dark Mild in a pub near work. When they merged their Dark and Light milds into one, it was never as good.
    Hydes had Three! milds. A light and mid dark in Manchester and a Black Mild for the Welsh areas. When a Camra member first reopened the Marble Arch, he insisted on the Hydes Black Mild . Maybe nostalgia but we were convinced these black rare milds were superia.
    Thwaites Best Mild was superb, but you can't take the Black out of Blackburn (Burns too many holes!)
    Wilsons Bitter - The 1974 GBG said "Can be excellent" It was! The same beer in the 80's could have said "Avoid at all costs" Wilsons later admitted they ruined it to save costs.
    Boddingtons Bitter - The beer that changed my life (for the better). It was a very pale dull straw colour, almost hazy. When it turned golden and shiny it was gone. Boddingtons ruined it themselves to save money long before Whitbread got their hands on it. That was just the final death sentence.
    Pollards bitter. The first of the new breweries in the 70's. We used to drive to Camra's White Gates in Hyde in our lunch (hour!). I bought gallons of it in their Stockport brewing shop.
    Hartleys Bitter. Another regular lunchtime trip to the White Gates. When they changed to Hartleys Best Bitter it was not as lunch time slutching.
    I was also very partial to Marston's Merry Monk before they gave up brewing (proper) beer.
    That's an interesting list. Robinson's Dark Mild was rare as I recall. I do remember the landlord of the Vaynol Arms in Nant Peris telling me about a cask of their light Mild that turned out to be dark It was in fact Old Tom and provided hours of fun for the locals.
    I remember getting bottles of Lees Dark from the Morrisons in Loughtom and then they knocked the ABV down to 2.8%. It tasted rubbish like a watered down brown ale and I wrote to the brewery telling them so.
    I've never really got along with Hydes but I can't really explain why!! Thwaites were highly rated back in the day and actually opened a pub in North London. For me Wilson's (and Webster's) were tainted by the Watney ownership.
    The downfall of Boddington is the first great tragedy in my drinking memory.
    I remember that Manchester CAMRA pub but only remember an area called Belle Vue
    Owd Roger was always a bigger prize than Merry Monk. I don't really remember much about it!

  9. #9
    Old & Bitter oldboots's Avatar
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    I think I lament more the loss of decent versions of beers, some of which are still about in bowdlerised form, than beers from long dead breweries.

    Draught Bass is probably the prime example but Gales HSB in its pre -1980 form and Pedigree in its pre circa 2000 form would fit the bill. The inclusion of HSB pre Fullers reminds me that Boddingtons was dumbed down before they sold out to Whitbread. Ruddles County was an early example of a beer destroyed by big brewery accountants who fell for the myth that the brand was more important than the product. Jennings Cumberland seems to be another. Pub Curmudgeon mentioned Gales 5X, which he didn't know was actually a blend of BBB and Prize Old Ale, gorgeous stuff it was too; I miss that as much as Prize Old Ale, decent White Shield (although it's not bad these days) and Courage Imperial Russian Stout.
    Drink drink, whoever you may be,
    we are the drunk and disorderly,
    and we’ll drink more beer wherever we may be,
    and we’ll meet you all in a pub said he.

    Dr Busker

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    Between pubs sheffield hatter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldboots View Post
    I think I lament more the loss of decent versions of beers, some of which are still about in bowdlerised form, than beers from long dead breweries.

    Draught Bass is probably the prime example but Gales HSB in its pre -1980 form and Pedigree in its pre circa 2000 form would fit the bill. The inclusion of HSB pre Fullers reminds me that Boddingtons was dumbed down before they sold out to Whitbread. Ruddles County was an early example of a beer destroyed by big brewery accountants who fell for the myth that the brand was more important than the product. Jennings Cumberland seems to be another.
    Yes, all those of course. Especially Boddies.

    Tandleman mentions Tetleys, but being from the wrong side of the Pennines he was referring to Warrington Tetleys rather than the, to my taste, superior Leeds Tetleys. (He says Warrington was "lighter and more complex in taste than the Leeds version ... [with a] slightly sourish finish".) Well, each to their own, of course, but Leeds Tetleys, served with a tight sparkler through an autovac was a tremendous beer.

    Your mention of Jennings Cumberland reminds me of the mess Marstons have been making of their Jennings beers in recent years. First the Bitter was emasculated, then given a different name; then Sneck Lifter was made with inferior malt with added caramel (I don't know this for sure, it's just what my taste buds told me) and has now been relegated to a seasonal, apparently; and going back to Cumberland Ale, it used to be a decent enough bitter, though I was never a huge fan, but is now approaching the insipidity of Wainwright. This is all because brands, money and shareholder value are seen as more important than providing a well-loved product to a discerning public.
    Come On You Hatters!

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