Ads not shown when logged in
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Thread: Bottled beer ..... not good

  1. #1
    Teetotal
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Posts
    3

    Default Bottled beer ..... not good

    So I'm a beer drinker and am missing my evening pint, I've been having a g&t early evening and a glass or two of wine, a glass or two is turning into a glass or four, I guess a need for 'volume' ... anyway I thought I'd get some bottled beers instead of all the red wine, a bottle of 'Doombar' arrived with the grocery delivery, chilled it in the fridge and behold .... it tastes of nothing but gas, I guess CO2 (though I'm not sure) ... are there any beers, canned or bottles, that compare to the taste of a cask ale ? ie taste of beer and not gas ... Guiness maybe ?

  2. #2
    This Space For Hire
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Stockton-on-Tees
    Posts
    662

    Default

    The cans of Vocation Smash and Grab I had on Friday were as good as any cask I remember. But I'll always avoid bottles, they just don't work for beer.

  3. #3
    This Space For Hire Aqualung's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    4,485

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Spinko View Post
    The cans of Vocation Smash and Grab I had on Friday were as good as any cask I remember. But I'll always avoid bottles, they just don't work for beer.
    I'll go along with that generally. The advances in bottles and cans has been considerable over the years. I'm speculating that this is partly due to using a mix of Nitrogen and CO2 rather than just CO2.
    I'm going to suggest (and you knew I would!) that choosing Doom Bore wasn't a great decision.
    I'm getting the majority of my beer delivered free by ELB. Two cases of 12 x 500ml bottles comes to £55.00 which is a price drop by them but I'm sure is giving them a better margin than delivering casks to chain pubs. Some local breweries seem to be still charging full price which I think is very short sighted.
    I've just checked out Old Dairy and they seem to be doing something similar. I don't know if you live within 15 miles of Tenterden but my advice is check out the local breweries. If a bottle is gassy then disperse the gas with a utensil of some sort.

    EDIT: My eyesight isn't that great and I read your username as someone I know lives in Kent! My advice remains the same, check out what local breweries are offering.
    Last edited by Aqualung; 20-04-2020 at 00:07.

  4. #4
    This Space For Hire Wittenden's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Weald of Kent
    Posts
    1,660

    Default

    Welcome to the site! Camra and SIBA have launched a website listing brewers who sell direct to the public.https://camra.org.uk/pullingtogether/
    I tend to agree than cans seem to maintain the quality of beer better than bottles nowdays.Also they're lighter, so delivery should be cheaper.
    "At that moment I would have given a kingdom, not for champagne or hock and soda, or hot coffee but for a glass of beer" Marquess Curzon of Kedlestone, Viceroy of India.

  5. #5
    Old & Bitter oldboots's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    God's Own County
    Posts
    5,394

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rogertb View Post
    So I'm a beer drinker and am missing my evening pint, I've been having a g&t early evening and a glass or two of wine, a glass or two is turning into a glass or four, I guess a need for 'volume' ... anyway I thought I'd get some bottled beers instead of all the red wine, a bottle of 'Doombar' arrived with the grocery delivery, chilled it in the fridge and behold .... it tastes of nothing but gas, I guess CO2 (though I'm not sure) ... are there any beers, canned or bottles, that compare to the taste of a cask ale ? ie taste of beer and not gas ... Guiness maybe ?
    You probably have two choices,

    a. get a 5l mini-keg from one of the good breweries, as long as you can store in a cool place, it's good but not quite cask and you can drink pints rather than children's portions from a can or bottle.
    b. pour the beer out and then get a spoon and give it a brisk stir to remove the excess gas (don't over do it).
    Drink drink, whoever you may be,
    we are the drunk and disorderly,
    and we’ll drink more beer wherever we may be,
    and we’ll meet you all in a pub said he.

    Dr Busker

  6. #6
    Between pubs sheffield hatter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Sheffield
    Posts
    3,281

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Spinko View Post
    But I'll always avoid bottles, they just don't work for beer.
    I find that stronger and darker beers work better in bottles. I do occasionally try a Black Sheep Ale 4.4%, but before drinking I'll stir the beer in the glass with a fork to get rid of some of the carbon dioxide.

    Some modern canned beers have a mouth feel that is very similar to cask (Vocation is an example, but Abbeydale are also good).

    I've been getting 3 litre containers of beer (a bag-in-a-box) delivered by a local brewery - Stancill. It's £15, which works out at less than £3 a pint. Delivery is free but only to local postcodes. (It keeps well because the bag collapses as the beer is drawn out, so no oxygen comes into contact with the beer.) No doubt other breweries have similar schemes.
    Come On You Hatters!

  7. #7
    Roving RAT ROBCamra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Rochdale
    Posts
    5,138

    Default

    My order from Brewdog arrived. So Elvis Juice, Hazy Jane and Clockwork Tangerine last night.

    I find their cans better than the draught in their bars as I can choose what temperature to serve it at.

    Not cask, but not bad at all.

    Vocation Life & Death, Pride & Joy and Heart & Soul are all equally as good.

    The Vocation beers are cheaper at our Asda than ordering direct from the brewery.
    Last edited by ROBCamra; 20-04-2020 at 14:28.
    A pub is for life not just for Christmas

  8. #8
    Between pubs sheffield hatter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Sheffield
    Posts
    3,281

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rogertb View Post
    ...it tastes of nothing but gas, I guess CO2 (though I'm not sure)...are there any beers, canned or bottles, that compare to the taste of a cask ale?
    There's some intersting stuff about CO2 in beer and why/how/whether it affects the taste here:

    "fermentation derived carbonation [is] a more delicate, more integrated effervescence than the coarse bubbles that result from CO2 delivered by gas suppliers and injected in-line. One theory ... [deals] with saturation aspects of CO2 around haze particles, visibly perceived or not evident. Arguably, a slow evolution of CO2 leads to a more gradual saturation and better mouthfeel properties in the final beer."
    Come On You Hatters!

  9. #9
    This Space For Hire AlanH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Ruabon, Wrexham
    Posts
    1,029

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sheffield hatter View Post
    There's some intersting stuff about CO2 in beer and why/how/whether it affects the taste here:

    "fermentation derived carbonation [is] a more delicate, more integrated effervescence than the coarse bubbles that result from CO2 delivered by gas suppliers and injected in-line. One theory ... [deals] with saturation aspects of CO2 around haze particles, visibly perceived or not evident. Arguably, a slow evolution of CO2 leads to a more gradual saturation and better mouthfeel properties in the final beer."
    Whether extraneous CO2 affects the taste has never been in doubt. We have always known that. It is the basis that Camra was formed 49 years ago.

  10. #10
    Between pubs sheffield hatter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Sheffield
    Posts
    3,281

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AlanH View Post
    Whether extraneous CO2 affects the taste has never been in doubt. We have always known that. It is the basis that Camra was formed 49 years ago.
    Well, yes, obviously I totally agree. But beer always has carbon dioxide in it, and it's a matter of how that gas arrived there (a natural product from the fermentation or injected from a cannister to deliver it through a tap) that is the point in question.

    The other thing about real ale is the way it continues to develop in the cask, rather than having its fermentation stopped by filtration and pasteurisation. It's not often that I have the same beer from cask and then the same beer from a bottle or served by gas pressure and think that the first beer was not superior. Actually, almost never.
    Come On You Hatters!

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-04-2016, 08:21
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-04-2016, 08:11
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 20-03-2016, 07:13
  4. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-01-2016, 08:13
  5. The Good Stuff - Great Yorkshire Bottled Beer
    By Blog Tracker in forum Blog Tracker
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 20-10-2014, 14:48

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •