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Thread: Pubs gone but not forgotten

  1. #21
    Just Missed the Round
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aqualung View Post
    I'd go back there anytime if only to have another go at finding the Little Prince (I couldn't even find the shopping area where it's situated!).
    Shopping area is not quite the right word - it's in an ancient cinema building painted a hideous and unmissable shade of pink, next door but one to Barnacles steak & ale house. Not open when I visited.
    On leaving the bar, I felt a strong blow to the back of my head. Turning round, I discovered it was the pavement

  2. #22
    Real Ale Drinker Brainypool's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pangolin View Post
    A splendid pub indeed, and a regular weekend visit for the superb 'doorstep' sandwiches! Sadly but not surprisingly I believe that it has now been converted to a private residence.
    Saddened to read that, and seems like a great waste of a classic popular pub by Fullers to me...

  3. #23
    This Space For Hire sheffield hatter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldboots View Post
    The begining of the end came with the closure of Gales brewery and its takeover by Fullers, Bernard had by now passed on to the great taproom in the sky and Janet was losing the use of her legs through illness and old age, she still brought the coal in however by having the sack put on a child's trolley. After her death Fullers shut the pub but who knows maybe one day it will reopen but it won't be the same.
    That's very sad.

    Permission granted in 2016 to convert to a house, according to WhatPub.
    Come On You Hatters!

  4. #24
    I'll stay on me own Gann's Avatar
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    Anyone who was around in South Hertfordshire and near to St Albans in the late 70's when CAMRA really started to get going will have broken their real ale teeth in this one..

    And as an output of Hatfield Poly as was, I've several lost nights from the memory bank..

    The Barley Mow
    Work is the curse of the drinking Class - Oscar Wilde

  5. #25
    I'll stay on me own Gann's Avatar
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    Default Barley Mow.. South Hertfordshire Classic and St Albans CAMRA first real success

    And now with the correct instruction for header ..

    Anyone who was around in South Hertfordshire and near to St Albans in the late 70's when CAMRA really started to get going will have broken their real ale teeth in this one..

    And as an output of Hatfield Poly as was, I've several lost nights from the memory bank..

    The Barley Mow
    Work is the curse of the drinking Class - Oscar Wilde

  6. #26
    This Space For Hire Aqualung's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gann View Post
    And now with the correct instruction for header ..

    Anyone who was around in South Hertfordshire and near to St Albans in the late 70's when CAMRA really started to get going will have broken their real ale teeth in this one..

    And as an output of Hatfield Poly as was, I've several lost nights from the memory bank..

    The Barley Mow
    I remember it well, it must surely have been the first rural "beer festival" pub. One evening a small convoy of cars took off from Central London with the objective of "going through the card". I don't think anyone managed it with Old Peculier being the main stumbling block.

    Some years later the Wicked Lady at Nomansland Common emerged. It had a small front bar with a few beers but further back there was a room that they put a counter across the front of, put stillage along the side walls and installed a proper cooling system. I can't remember how many beers they had on at a time but they certainly had enough room for a couple of dozen casks. It sounds a bit gastro now and apparently sells Doom Bore!

  7. #27
    Old & Bitter oldboots's Avatar
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    Default The Bay Tree, Southampton

    I think I've mentioned this pub a couple times in the past, it has a very special place in my drinking life as it was the scene of my conversion to "real ale". When I was very young I shunned bitter (and mild) after an unfortunate incident with some Whitbread Trophy and stuck to Draught Guinness. A friend suggested I try Gales HSB and that was that, I was hooked and never looked back.

    The Bay Tree was a small two bar Gales pub with a function room upstairs, the public was at the front with a smaller lounge at the back, you could reach the lounge either by a separate door which also led upstairs or via the Gents from the Public. The building probably dated to just after the Second World War as the area was heavily bombed and badly redeveloped afterwards. I attended the college across the road and we used the pub for our morning tea break as it opened in time and for lunch. Lunch would be a "Rat" pasty with lashings of brown sauce and as many pints of HSB, BBB or 5X as we could manage, on special occasions a third of a pint bottle of Prize Old Ale would be drunk or we might forget to go back and try the Gales Country Wine Challenge. In those days there were about 30 wines in the range usually arranged in alphabetical order along a shelf, the challenge being to see how far you could get along the shelf; Mead usually defeated me as it was particularly nasty but once on to Parsnip it got better. My college notes from that time are sometimes unreadable and show clearly how much I had drunk, we used to have to catch up with notes from soberer classmates.

    The landlord at the time was Fred Gillante, a huge man of over twenty stone who used to moan about how much money he lost on a Chihuahua farm in Ireland among other tales, the barman was a hard case who looked like those sometimes drawn by Bill Tidy in his Kegbuster cartoon. Occasionally a woman would be glimpsed in the lounge but at lunchtimes it was frequently mainly by our tutors, us students stuck to the public although there were sometimes tense meetings in the Gents. Dogs were welcome in the public, most drank bitter from handled mugs, it was that kind of pub. The HSB could catch up with some people, next to the main door of the Public was a fruit machine and we had fun watching a chap attempting to open the fruit machine instead of the door one afternoon. We later spotted him asleep, draped over some railings down the road as we staggered back to college.

    After I left college, somehow having managed to pass the exams, the college was renamed Solent University and the pub was renamed the Graduate, eventually it closed as a pub.

    Tell us, now, how and when
    We may find the bravest men?
    A sure test, an easy test:
    Those that drink beer are the best

  8. #28
    This Space For Hire Aqualung's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldboots View Post
    I think I've mentioned this pub a couple times in the past, it has a very special place in my drinking life as it was the scene of my conversion to "real ale". When I was very young I shunned bitter (and mild) after an unfortunate incident with some Whitbread Trophy and stuck to Draught Guinness. A friend suggested I try Gales HSB and that was that, I was hooked and never looked back.

    The Bay Tree was a small two bar Gales pub with a function room upstairs, the public was at the front with a smaller lounge at the back, you could reach the lounge either by a separate door which also led upstairs or via the Gents from the Public. The building probably dated to just after the Second World War as the area was heavily bombed and badly redeveloped afterwards. I attended the college across the road and we used the pub for our morning tea break as it opened in time and for lunch. Lunch would be a "Rat" pasty with lashings of brown sauce and as many pints of HSB, BBB or 5X as we could manage, on special occasions a third of a pint bottle of Prize Old Ale would be drunk or we might forget to go back and try the Gales Country Wine Challenge. In those days there were about 30 wines in the range usually arranged in alphabetical order along a shelf, the challenge being to see how far you could get along the shelf; Mead usually defeated me as it was particularly nasty but once on to Parsnip it got better. My college notes from that time are sometimes unreadable and show clearly how much I had drunk, we used to have to catch up with notes from soberer classmates.

    The landlord at the time was Fred Gillante, a huge man of over twenty stone who used to moan about how much money he lost on a Chihuahua farm in Ireland among other tales, the barman was a hard case who looked like those sometimes drawn by Bill Tidy in his Kegbuster cartoon. Occasionally a woman would be glimpsed in the lounge but at lunchtimes it was frequently mainly by our tutors, us students stuck to the public although there were sometimes tense meetings in the Gents. Dogs were welcome in the public, most drank bitter from handled mugs, it was that kind of pub. The HSB could catch up with some people, next to the main door of the Public was a fruit machine and we had fun watching a chap attempting to open the fruit machine instead of the door one afternoon. We later spotted him asleep, draped over some railings down the road as we staggered back to college.

    After I left college, somehow having managed to pass the exams, the college was renamed Solent University and the pub was renamed the Graduate, eventually it closed as a pub.

    I don't recognise this place at all. In my student days at UCL we tended to stick to the student union bar which sold rubbish. Some misfit or other (I don't think it was me!) discovered that the nearby Marlborough Arms sold bottles of Courage Imperial Russian Stout as it was a Courage pub in those days. As a result on the odd occasion we would leave the student bar at the 14:00 closing time and get in a pint of Russian Stout before returning to the student union. I don't think there was a single occasion when this didn't end up in a total shambolic disaster! We didn't even know that it was "officially" a real ale, it was only when we discovered Young's that we started to realise the difference.
    I remember the Gales Country Wines very well but didn't drink that many of them. They were real Eight Ace stuff as I recall! I think I once bought a bottle to take home from one of their pubs, possibly this one which I thought had closed down and at the time was seen as the most accessible one form London.

  9. #29
    Old & Bitter oldboots's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aqualung View Post
    I don't recognise this place at all.
    https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@50.90...7i16384!8i8192 looking similar but the door to the public bar is bricked up.

    Quote Originally Posted by Aqualung View Post
    we would leave the student bar at the 14:00 closing time and get in a pint of Russian Stout before returning to the student union. I don't think there was a single occasion when this didn't end up in a total shambolic disaster!
    Respect! Three bottles of IRS between sessions is heroic, it was around 11% ABV. I was a great fan of it myself and a friend of mine drank it by the crate when he was at Bristol Uni, and I mean by the crate - there was a short pile of them in a corner of his room in the hall of residence.

    BTW the Le Coq version brewed and bottled by Harveys is very close to the Courage/Barclays version of the 1970s maybe a bit weaker.

    Tell us, now, how and when
    We may find the bravest men?
    A sure test, an easy test:
    Those that drink beer are the best

  10. #30
    This Space For Hire Aqualung's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldboots View Post
    https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@50.90...7i16384!8i8192 looking similar but the door to the public bar is bricked up.



    Respect! Three bottles of IRS between sessions is heroic, it was around 11% ABV. I was a great fan of it myself and a friend of mine drank it by the crate when he was at Bristol Uni, and I mean by the crate - there was a short pile of them in a corner of his room in the hall of residence.

    BTW the Le Coq version brewed and bottled by Harveys is very close to the Courage/Barclays version of the 1970s maybe a bit weaker.
    To describe it as "between sessions" is not entirely accurate. It always terminated any festivities.

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