Ads not shown when logged in
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 22

Thread: What is Bad about Shepherd Neame

  1. #11
    Glass Half Empty General Staal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Somewhere in the north of Birmingham
    Posts
    198

    Default

    I spent a holiday in Kent. I tried the range of Shepherd Neame ales. They all tasted the same to me, and I didn't like them. Even now, if I see an SN ale I've not tried, I'll always give it a go, but it still tastes like all the others.

    I find they have a slightly strange taste, rather akin to the odd flavour of a boiled sweet you have found in your pocket, that may have been there for years and is covered in fluff, but you give it a go anyway, then wish you hadn't, but can't spit it out because you're meeting your wife's best friend and her partner and to spit it out would give a bad impression. So you work it around until its gone, trying not to grimace while you're doing so.

    In fact, Shepherd Neame is, in my opinion, simply unpleasant.
    I'll just stay till we've won the quiz...Or taken over the world...Whichever comes first

  2. #12
    In Search of Ebriety Millay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Wandering, or wondering, or wandering in.
    Posts
    1,368

    Default

    I'm not a Sheps fan either and, like the General, think they all taste much the same, with the possible exception of Bishops Finger. It's that musty almost sulpherous tinge that I find unpleasant. Strongers' mention of soil is a good description and I often feel as if I've been chewing a stick of chalk after finishing a pint.
    I've just joined Alcoholics Anonymous - I still drink, just under a different name.

  3. #13
    Down but not out Mobyduck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    North East Hampshire
    Posts
    3,864

    Default

    There is no doubt it is an acquired taste ,but if you acquire it ,its not so bad,it took me 30 years.
    "Everybody's got to believe in something. I believe I'll have another beer."
    -W.C.Fields

  4. #14
    In Search of Ebriety Millay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Wandering, or wondering, or wandering in.
    Posts
    1,368

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mobyduck View Post
    There is no doubt it is an acquired taste ,but if you acquire it ,its not so bad,it took me 30 years.
    But was it worth it with the plethora of micro brews and interesting beers around now?
    I've just joined Alcoholics Anonymous - I still drink, just under a different name.

  5. #15
    Down but not out Mobyduck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    North East Hampshire
    Posts
    3,864

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Millay View Post
    But was it worth it with the plethora of micro brews and interesting beers around now?
    Absolutely not, but if I do find myself in a Sheps pub for whatever reason, it's not the disaster it once was.
    "Everybody's got to believe in something. I believe I'll have another beer."
    -W.C.Fields

  6. #16
    In Search of Ebriety Millay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Wandering, or wondering, or wandering in.
    Posts
    1,368

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mobyduck View Post
    Absolutely not, but if I do find myself in a Sheps pub for whatever reason, it's not the disaster it once was.
    I understand that, there are some i interesting SN pubs around and I now know enough about their beers to want to go in and be selective as to what i drink
    I've just joined Alcoholics Anonymous - I still drink, just under a different name.

  7. #17
    This Space For Hire Aqualung's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    4,027

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Millay View Post
    I'm not a Sheps fan either and, like the General, think they all taste much the same, with the possible exception of Bishops Finger. It's that musty almost sulpherous tinge that I find unpleasant. Strongers' mention of soil is a good description and I often feel as if I've been chewing a stick of chalk after finishing a pint.
    I understand this comment as I think that Adnams beers also have this quality, I can only think that it's down to the water or yeast strain. I've always thought that Marston's beers and the original Ind Coope Burton Ale had this "sulphur" like hint similar to Sheps and Adnams. Burton water originates from limestone while Sheps I assume originates from the chalk downs.

    My knowledge of the Southwold geology is zero, but I wouldn't mind betting that there is chalk or limestone in the area.

  8. #18
    This Space For Hire Wittenden's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Weald of Kent
    Posts
    1,492

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Millay View Post
    But was it worth it with the plethora of micro brews and interesting beers around now?
    Nobody's mentioned Shep's Pilot brewery or the ales emanating therefrom ; I've never seen any nor tried 'em, not for want of trying. Some are said to be excellent-I think the wonderful Porter is one.
    "At that moment I would have given a kingdom, not for champagne or hock and soda, or hot coffee but for a glass of beer" Marquess Curzon of Kedlestone, Viceroy of India.

  9. #19
    Humble Wordsmith ETA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Normally Somerset, sometimes on a yacht.
    Posts
    1,190

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Aqualung View Post

    My knowledge of the Southwold geology is zero, but I wouldn't mind betting that there is chalk or limestone in the area.
    aqualung, my friend, don't you start away uneasy.... You're right that there is a lot of chalk just to the south of faversham. Personally, I am a great fan of sheps's distinctive flavours. I grew up in kent, so it's quite natural for me.

    Oddly, I'm writing this in jersey, where I've just had a fantastic pint of Canterbury jack.
    Last edited by ETA; 10-09-2012 at 23:57.

  10. #20
    Old & Bitter oldboots's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    God's Own County
    Posts
    4,760

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Aqualung View Post
    I understand this comment as I think that Adnams beers also have this quality, I can only think that it's down to the water or yeast strain. I've always thought that Marston's beers and the original Ind Coope Burton Ale had this "sulphur" like hint similar to Sheps and Adnams. Burton water originates from limestone while Sheps I assume originates from the chalk downs.

    My knowledge of the Southwold geology is zero, but I wouldn't mind betting that there is chalk or limestone in the area.
    To be a bit boring and technical, the water in Burton is high in gypsum and other salts and reckoned to be perfect for brewing pale ales. As a result most brewers "Burtonize" their water when making bitter, in other words they add gypsum etc to it to make it similar to the chemical profile of Burton water. These salts are the source of the sulphur flavour or "Burton Snatch" that used to be found in Bass and Pedigree but much less so now in my opinion. Adnams have always had a slightly sea weedy taste to me. I don't often get to drink Shep's beers.

    Tell us, now, how and when
    We may find the bravest men?
    A sure test, an easy test:
    Those that drink beer are the best

Similar Threads

  1. Called to the Bar - Shepherd Neame Generation
    By Blog Tracker in forum Blog Tracker
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 30-04-2012, 10:13
  2. Vandella, Shepherd Bush
    By rpadam in forum That Doesn't Go There!
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 25-04-2012, 16:43
  3. Shepherd's Crooked!
    By AlanH in forum That Doesn't Go There!
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-04-2012, 12:04
  4. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-03-2012, 09:36
  5. The Old Shepherd, Rickmansworth
    By Millay in forum That Doesn't Go There!
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-10-2010, 19:35

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •