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17-11-2010, 10:00
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Assembling information from a variety of sources. That's what this blog is all about. At least that's what I like to think. Today we've a good example of the insights that can bring.

Do you remember this table I posted a couple of days ago?


Whitbread bottled beers in 1872


Specific gravity
Original gravity of wort
Amount of alcohol
Amount of extract
Acetic acid
App. Atten-uation
Strong Ale


1013


1081.3


7.19


6.1


0.15


83.46%
Pale Ale


1010


1059.9


5.32


4.9


-


83.41%
Family Ale


1011


1057


4.82


5


0.14


79.94%
Extra Stout


1027


1076.7


5.26


8.9


0.13


65.04%
London Stout


1021


1067


4.88


7.2


0.15


68.92%
London Cooper


1016


1058.8


4.52


5.9


0.18


72.74%
Source:
The British Medical Journal, March 9th, 1872, page 27.
Note:
Apparent attenuation my calculation.

It's Whitbread's bottled beer range, analysed in 1872. I've also a Whitbread price list from just a couple of years later, 1874. Which confirms that Strong Ale, Pale Ale, Family Ale, Extra Stout, London Stout and Cooper made up that range:


(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_CHrKKDU9290/TODo4zRqAaI/AAAAAAAAHio/4jMRJdhYA_A/s1600/Whitbread_1870.JPG)
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_CHrKKDU9290/TODo-aHanjI/AAAAAAAAHis/MWoUJynuXiI/s640/Whitbread_1874.JPG (http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_CHrKKDU9290/TODo-aHanjI/AAAAAAAAHis/MWoUJynuXiI/s1600/Whitbread_1874.JPG)

Now it just so happens that I have photos of their brewing records for the same period. I couldn't resuist seeing how the beers matched up. It's thrown up more points of interest than I had expected. Here they are:

Whitbread beers in the 1870's
Date
Year
Beer
Style
OG
FG
ABV
App. Atten-uation
lbs hops/ qtr
hops lb/brl
boil time (hours)
boil time (hours)
boil time (hours)
Pitch temp
pale malt
brown malt
black malt
sugar
15th Mar
1871
PA
Pale Ale


1062.6


1020.5


5.57


67.26%


17.47


5.67


2.5






58º


82.23%






17.77%
17th Mar
1871
KKK
Stock Ale


1082.0


1028.3


7.11


65.54%


14.23


6.05


1.5


2




58º


84.51%






15.49%
6th Sep
1875
FA
Pale Ale


1052.1


1011.4


5.39


78.19%


12.37


2.93


2






58º


85.08%






14.92%
13th Jul
1871
SS
Stout


1077.6


1027.7


6.60


64.29%


15.26


5.04


1.5


2


2.5


63º


80.00%


15.00%


5.00%


13th Jul
1871
SSS
Stout


1092.0


1038.8


7.04


57.83%


15.26


5.98


1.5


2


2.5


62º


80.00%


15.00%


5.00%


16th Jul
1873
P
Porter


1059.3


1022.7


4.84


61.68%


11.64


2.65


1.5


2




64º


92.75%


0.00%


7.25%


Sources:
Whitbread brewing records held at the London Metropolitan Archives.


http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_CHrKKDU9290/TOFOCL2nzlI/AAAAAAAAHjY/zYlFHAEVmMs/s320/Whitbread_beers_in_the_1870s.JPG (http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_CHrKKDU9290/TOFOCL2nzlI/AAAAAAAAHjY/zYlFHAEVmMs/s1600/Whitbread_beers_in_the_1870s.JPG)

One thing immediately stands out: the differences in attenuation. The FG’s of the bottles analysed are much lower than those in the brewing records. Which makes a lot of sense. The final gravities given in the logs are the gravities when “started”. In old brewing terminology, than means the start of secondary conditioning. Whitbread’s bottled beers were, at the time, all naturally conditioned. They would have undergone a secondary fermentation in casks or tanks before being bottled. Hence the difference in gravities.


The OG’s all pretty much tally with those from the brewing records. Except for London Stout. Whitbread didn’t brew a Stout with a gravity of 1067. But you know what? A 50-50 mix of Porter and SS would have given a gravity of 1068.45. Which is funny, because Cooper is supposed to be a mix of Porter and Stout. Whereas here it’s clearly just the standard Porter bottled.


I think we’ve all learnt something today. Maybe nothing useful, but still something.https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/5445569787371915337-2067181695492879951?l=barclayperkins.blogspot.com


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