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14-10-2010, 08:12
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Thursday is again Wedenesday this week. Aplogies for any confusion this may cause.

I always have some didactic point I'm trying to make with these recipes. Today's is a good example. Export beers. To me an Export version was by definition stronger than the domestic beer. But, as you may have noticed with beers like Export India Porter this wasn't always the case. It's very much a 20th-century development. More specifically, it dates from WW I and its aftermath.

As I'm sure you're now all aware, WW I had a dramatic effect on the gravity of British beers. Well at least the ones consumed in the UK.The same wasn't true of beers for export. The constraints of taxation and consumer reluctance to pay more for their beer didn't apply to export beers. Pre-WW I the difference between domestic and export versions of a beer was the hopping. It being rather more heavy in the export beer. After WW I the export versions remained at their old gravities. Effectively, they became stronger than the standard version.

Guinness is an excellent example. Until 1916, Guinness Extra Stout and Foreign Extra Stout had the same gravity, 1075. In the 1920's, Extra Stout was 1055 and FES pretty much unchanged at 1074. WW II knocked ES down to 1045, while FES was 1072. You get the idea.

It's the same story with Barclay Perkins PA. Before WW I, the domestic version, at 1060, was stronger than the export, at 1058. In the 1920's, BP's domestic PA was 1053, while the export remained at 1058.

Wasn't that fascinating? I can now remove my mortar board and pass you over to Kristen . . . . . . .








Barclay Perkins - 1928 - Export PA
General info: Back to the good old ripping strong hoppy ales. This is one of a set of what people today would say was a 'proper' IPA. A lot of flavors similar too Meantime IPA but with much more graininess that is given by the American 6-row grain. Just enough invert to dry out the finish to keep it from being overly sweet. The high finishing gravity lends a much fuller, richer beer that the gravity should make it. The flavors are halfway between an IPA and a Barley Wine...a baby Barley Wine if you will.


Beer Specifics




Recipe by percentages
Gravity (OG)


1.058


31.6% American 6-row
0%
Gravity (FG)


1.017


60.3% English pale malt
0%
ABV


5.50%


7.7% Invert No1
0%
Apparent attenuation


71.26%


0.5% Caramel colorant


Real attenuation


58.38%
















IBU


62.0




Mash
90min@149.5°F


1.24qt/lb


SRM


14






90min@65.3°C


2.59L/kg


EBC


28.1




























Boil


2.5 hours






































Homebrew @ 70%


Craft @ 80%


Grist


5gal


19L


10bbl


10hl
American 6-row


3.45
lb


1.572
kg


187.30
lb


72.37
kg
English pale malt


6.59
lb


3.001
kg


357.58
lb


138.16
kg
Invert No1


0.84
lb


0.381
kg


45.41
lb


17.54
kg
Caramel colorant


0.05
lb


0.024
kg


2.84
lb


1.10
kg




10.933




4.978




593.12879










Hops
























Goldings 4.5% 150min


0.74
oz


21.1
g


46.13
oz


1.114
kg
Goldings 4.5% 90min


0.95
oz


27.0
g


59.10
oz


1.428
kg
Goldings 4.5% 60min


1.91
oz


54.0
g


118.20
oz


2.856
kg
Goldings 4.5% dry hop


0.53
oz


15.1
g


33.10
oz


0.800
kg


























Fermentation


72°F /22.2°C






































Yeast
Nottingham ale


1028 London Ale Yeast - WLP013 London Ale Yeast
























Tasting Notes:
Hops. Check. More hops. Double check. Spicy orangina nose. Mouth full of hop resins and strong barbarian tea. Sweet malt and lady fingers, toffee covered biscuits and golden syrup. Sweet finish dries up rather well. Nearly has an 'old fashioned' bitters, sweet and whiskey character. This is currently aging in a ex-bourbon barrel. We'll see....

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