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13-10-2010, 10:00
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Table time again. Though just a small one today.Courage K Ales in the 19th century.

I've only two years. I'm lkucky to have even those. The proper brewing records only go back to 1914. This information has been culled from another source. The private notebook of a brewer. Diary I should say. The details of each day's brews have been written in a pocket diary. You know what's weird? If it didn't have 1858 printed at the top, it could be this year's. Funny how little some things change.


Courage K Ales 1858-1867
Date
Year
Beer
Style
OG
lbs hops/ qtr
hops lb/brl
pale malt
PA malt
4th Jan
1858
K Ale XX
Stock Ale


1078.95


12.00


4.57




100.00%
18th Jan
1858
K Ale XX
Stock Ale


1078.95


12.00


4.62




100.00%
1st Feb
1858
K Ale XX
Stock Ale


1080.33


12.00


4.78




100.00%
8th Feb
1858
K Ale XX
Stock Ale


1078.95


12.00


4.77




100.00%
15th Feb
1858
K Ale XX
Stock Ale


1080.33


12.00


5.04




100.00%
28th Dec
1858
K Ale XX
Stock Ale


1078.39


12.00


4.78




100.00%
15th Apr
1867
K Ale XX
Stock Ale


1079.22


14.00


4.98


100.00%


12th Jan
1858
K Ale XXX
Stock Ale


1086.70


11.00


5.24


100.00%


25th Jan
1858
K Ale XXX
Stock Ale


1087.26


14.00


6.75




100.00%
Source:
Courage brewing records held at the London Metropolitan Archives

You know waht else is odd? In the early 19th century, London brewers used a couple of different ways of deignating K Ales. Truman used a K suffix: XXK, XXXK, XXXXK. Whitbread did the exact opposite and used a prefix: KXX, KXXX, KXXXX. Courage managed to find yet another way: K Ale XX, K Ale XXX. But by 1900 they'd all switched to KK, KKK and KKKK. I wonder why that was? Perhaps it was a recognition of the fact that X Ales and K Ales had diverged to such an extent that they were truly separate families.

These are the ancestors of 20th-century Burton. I'm not sure if they were already called that by thuis period. (There's something else to investigate: when drinkers started calling Stock Ales Burton in London. Maybe Martyn Cornell has some idea.)

I'm not sure why I bothered including the grists are they're so dull. Just one type of malt. Interestingly, Courage's X Ales were not this simple. But more of that later. I'm saving the discovery for later. Let's just say this: it complicates the story of Mild's development.https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/5445569787371915337-2011293060963391143?l=barclayperkins.blogspot.com


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