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11-08-2019, 10:08
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Trying to pick apart IPA and Pale Ale in Scotland is even trickier than in London. Judging by the brew house names, some brewers considered all their Pale Ales IPAs. And William Younger, confusingly, while not calling any of their beers IPA in the brew house, did market some of its beers as such.

That’s just a warning to not take as gospel that the following beers are IPAs. They might have been. Or maybe not. The distinction was probably lost on most drinkers, anyway.

PI 60/- was Drybrough’s strongest Pale Ale/IPA at the start of the war. Though it’s weaker than a top-class London Pale Ale would have been.

In the first couple of years of the war, it didn’t change a great deal, losing just four gravity points. It was dropped in 1917, probably in April. This was the time when gravity restrictions kicked in. Unlike some breweries, which slashed gravities but kept the name of the strongest beer, Drybrough discontinued the strongest.



Drybrough PI 60/- 1914 - 1920


Date
Year
OG
FG
ABV
App. Atten-uation
lbs hops/ qtr
hops lb/brl


31st Dec
1914
1054
1018
4.76
66.67%
5.07
1.12


12th Jan
1915
1053
1018
4.63
66.04%
6.01
1.29


7th Jan
1916
1053
1017
4.76
67.92%
5.02
1.10


28th Jul
1916
1050
1015
4.63
70.00%
3.95
0.85


16th Jan
1917
1048
1016
4.23
66.67%
3.95
0.80


13th Feb
1917
1044
1017
3.57
61.36%
4.04
0.74


10th Jul
1919
1036
1009
3.57
75.00%
4.93
0.73


15th Oct
1919
1039
1012
3.57
69.23%
4.34
0.83


29th Jul
1920
1039
1012
3.57
69.23%
5.20
0.86


Sources:


Drybrough brewing record held at the Scottish Brewing Archive, document number D/6/1/1/3.



It reappears in the records in the middle of 1919, with its gravity even further reduced. Its gravity then stabilised just under 1040º for the rest of the 1920’s. However, in 1920 they introduced a new beer, PI 80/- with an OG of 1054º - exactly the same as PI 60/- had been before the war. Confusing, isn’t it?



Drybrough PI 60/- 1914 - 1920







invert sugar






Date
Year
OG
pale malt
flaked maize
no. 1
no. 2
no. 3
caramel
malt extract
dxt
BSC


31st Dec
1914
1054
81.91%
8.19%
4.10%
5.46%



0.34%



12th Jan
1915
1053
82.66%
8.55%
3.80%
4.75%



0.24%



7th Jan
1916
1053
81.47%
8.81%
3.67%
5.87%

0.18%





28th Jul
1916
1050
85.87%
4.40%
3.67%
5.87%

0.18%





16th Jan
1917
1048
80.61%
9.21%
3.84%
6.14%

0.19%





13th Feb
1917
1044
80.50%
10.06%
3.35%
5.87%

0.21%





10th Jul
1919
1036
91.18%
0.00%


8.82%






15th Oct
1919
1039
78.83%
4.38%


6.57%
10.22%





29th Jul
1920
1039
70.45%
19.43%



1.62%
1.21%

7.29%


Sources:


Drybrough brewing record held at the Scottish Brewing Archive, document number D/6/1/1/3.



Like the gravity, there’s not much change in the early war years. It’s not the most fascinating of recipes, just pale malt, flaked maize and some sugar. With all the changes being in the type of sugar used. Though we don’t see that in action as PI 60/- had already been discontinued by the time the restrictions on sugar use began in 1917.

This is another exccerpt from my book on the Great War, Armistice!.

Buy this wonderful book (http://www.lulu.com/shop/ronald-pattinson/armistice/paperback/product-23859948.html).






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