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Strongers
26-02-2012, 20:56
http://www.pubsgalore.co.uk/pubs/19366/

I've read this posting from the 13th Feb several times and can't make sense of it. Maybe the owner could clarify what is meant as he has reviewed a fair few pubs so maybe reads the forums.

Andy Ven
26-02-2012, 21:16
I agree, it's not easy to read, especially as it is missing punctuation. I reckon he meant to say:

Called in on the 13th of Feb. Nice pub right by the railway station. Had a nice pint of Guinness. It was about 7pm.

While I was stood at the bar, lots of different people came in and asked for food. They said they had knocked it of for a bit until trade picked up.

Would call back.

Can anybody tell me why all the nearly all the people in this little town don't talk.

ROBCamra
27-02-2012, 07:57
Can anybody tell me why all the nearly all the people in this little town don't talk.

I haven't been in Littleborouigh since the 16th Feb. I found plenty of people to talk to in the Sheaf, the Lion, the Oak and Toppo's. No problem at all. :confused:

RogerB
27-02-2012, 10:14
It bears a striking resemblance to some of my late night 10 pints down the hatch text messages. :eek:

Crossste
28-02-2012, 18:22
I live in this little "town" and if me and the wife had been out on the same night as Mr Hunter he may well have posted "Why do the women in this town never shut up".

Any donkeys left with four legs round here run a mile when the see the wife approaching.

Can't agree with him giving the Shef 9 either it was dire last time i was in.

Maldenman
06-03-2012, 09:52
Here's another one!

Royal Oak (http://www.pubsgalore.co.uk/pubs/19363/)

hondo
06-03-2012, 10:13
cant wait for the review if he bumps into :( me :( in a pub

702 ;)

Conrad
06-03-2012, 10:30
Just a cautionary note, the tone of this thread is a little close to persecution of a contributor for my comfort, in that it is about only one member and primarily negative. :o

hondo
06-03-2012, 10:37
Just a cautionary note, the tone of this thread is a little close to persecution of a contributor for my comfort, in that it is about only one member and primarily negative. :o

having a go at myself more than him but understand where your coming from

Conrad
06-03-2012, 10:43
Yeah yours was quite funny :). In fact no real problem with any post, just trying to get in before the thread goes South (I have no idea what that means, and as I live in the South not sure I should use it).

hondo
06-03-2012, 10:49
Yeah yours was quite funny :). In fact no real problem with any post, just trying to get in before the thread goes South (I have no idea what that means, and as I live in the South not sure I should use it).

a bit like going/gone for a burton :confused:

ROBCamra
06-03-2012, 12:05
just trying to get in before the thread goes South (I have no idea what that means, and as I live in the South not sure I should use it).

To get to you it would have to go West as well. :p

Another one that I don't know what it really means. :confused:

Although this is allegedly what going for a Burton means which would be appropriate on here.

It was RAF slang in world war two, and was taken from a series of adverts for Burton Ale - there would always be someone obviously missing from the scene, ie an empty chair or something, and the catch phrase was 'He's gone for a Burton'
RAF crews used it as a euphemism for people killed or missing in action.

:cheers:

oldboots
06-03-2012, 14:07
To get to you it would have to go West as well. :p

Another one that I don't know what it really means. :confused:

:cheers:

"Going West" allegedly refers to the fact that Tyburn was west of Newgate prison, so those going west went to be hanged.

Farway
06-03-2012, 16:28
"Going West" allegedly refers to the fact that Tyburn was west of Newgate prison, so those going west went to be hanged.

Ah, that ties in nicely with "On the wagon"

The condemned had to stay "On the wagon" [yep a real horse drawn wagon] as their executioners / warders stopped for a refreshing pint or three on the way to the gallows

Soup Dragon
06-03-2012, 16:54
where does drunk as a skunk come from?

do skunks even drink?

Rex_Rattus
06-03-2012, 16:54
Ah, that ties in nicely with "On the wagon"

The condemned had to stay "On the wagon" [yep a real horse drawn wagon] as their executioners / warders stopped for a refreshing pint or three on the way to the gallows

Actually I think that it was one of the warders that had to stay on the waggon while his colleagues accompanied the condemned for his last bowl of ale in this world. Thus he didn't get to drink and was therefore "on the waggon". Typically it would have been in the "Bowl" pub in St giles (although there were others), where The Angel pub sits today. I read of a case of one poor soul who declined the offer of ale, and thus arrived at Tyburn earlier than otherwise, and was executed before his stay of execution arrived! The moral here of course is never pass up the chance of a beer or two!

Andy Ven
06-03-2012, 19:49
where does drunk as a skunk come from?

do skunks even drink?

Have you ever seen a newt worse for wear?

ROBCamra
07-03-2012, 07:57
Have you ever seen a newt worse for wear?

Or a judge sober? :p

Wittenden
07-03-2012, 08:07
Or a judge sober? :p

Or a sack pi55ed?

Conrad
07-03-2012, 09:11
I may have to start rating all these. Have to admit this one still makes me smirk.


To get to you it would have to go West as well. :p

Far too smoothly interjected.

NickDavies
07-03-2012, 10:32
Or a judge sober? :p

Accused: "I was drunk as a Judge."
Judge: "I think you'll find the expression is 'drunk as a lord'."
Accused: "Yes, my lord."

Soup Dragon
07-03-2012, 10:56
I always liked a put-down by the Senator Cleghorn character, later re-used in Grease

"I've seen better heads on a mug of beer"